PodCastle 125: The Whistling Room

Show Notes

Rated PG: For Things That Whistle in the Night

Featuring Carnacki, the Ghost Finder


The Whistling Room

by William Hope Hodgson

“‘The whistling started about ten o’clock, on the second night, as Ibsaid. Tom and I were in the library, when we heard an awfully queer whistling, coming along the East Corridor–The room is in the East Wing, you know.

“‘That’s that blessed ghost!’ I said to Tom, and we collared the lamps off the table, and went up to have a look. I tell you, even as we dug along the corridor, it took me a bit in the throat, it was so beastly queer. It was a sort of tune, in a way; but more as if a devil or some rotten thing were laughing at you, and going to get ’round at your back. That’s how it makes you feel.

“‘When we got to the door, we didn’t wait; but rushed it open; and then I tell you the sound of the thing fairly hit me in the face. Tom said he got it the same way–sort of felt stunned and bewildered. We looked all ’round, and soon got so nervous, we just cleared out, and I locked the door.

About the Author

William Hope Hodgson

William Hope Hodgson (15 November 1877 – April 1918) was an English author. He produced a large body of work, consisting of essays, short fiction, and novels, spanning several overlapping genres including horror, fantastic fiction, and science fiction.[1] Hodgson used his experiences at sea to lend authentic detail to his short horror stories, many of which are set on the ocean, including his series of linked tales forming the “Sargasso Sea Stories”. His novels, such as The House on the Borderland (1908) and The Night Land (1912), feature more cosmic themes, but several of his novels also focus on horrors associated with the sea. Early in his writing career Hodgson dedicated effort to poetry, although few of his poems were published during his lifetime. He also attracted some notice as a photographer and achieved renown as a bodybuilder. He died in World War I at age 40.

Find more by William Hope Hodgson

Elsewhere

About the Narrator

Paul S. Jenkins

Paul S. Jenkins has narrated for Escape Pod, Pseudopod and PodCastle a number of times, and was the very first narrator at PodCastle. His science fiction podcast novel THE PLITONE REVISIONIST is available for free at Podiobooks.com. His maintains healthy skepticism with his skeptical blog NOTES FROM AN EVIL BURNEE and his skeptical podcast SKEPTICULE (aka “The Three Pauls Podcast“).

Find more by Paul S. Jenkins

Elsewhere